Building Bridges, not Walls

UnknownThis September will mark 15 years since the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York. Not yet a generation, but long enough that children who were just born are only now slipping into adolescence. So it is not surprising that there has been a flurry of books about the attack coming on the market for middle grade readers. I’ve spent the last month reading a good number of them, and one, in particular, stood out for me.

“Towers Falling” by the already accomplished author Jewell Parker Rhodes, has done a brilliant job making a difficult story compelling yet accessible for 10-year-old readers. In her capable hands, one of the most horrific tragedies in recent memory shares space with the numbing everyday tragedies so many souls on our planet endure daily.

Rhodes’ plucky protagonist, Deja, tells her first-person point-of-view narration in the short, clipped sentences you might expect from a kid who’s sharing one room in a homeless shelter with her parents and two younger siblings. Deja is mad—at the world, at her classmates, especially at her dad. His physical and mental troubles keep him unemployed and keep Deja’s family on the edge.

When Deja’s sixth grade teacher begins a month-long lesson meant to introduce the class to the upcoming 9/11 anniversary, Deja is clueless. Why is everyone staring out the window at the downtown New York skyline, looking so stricken? She’s been so busy struggling to get through every day, that she sees no purpose in looking backwards to the past.

But slowly, Deja comes to understand how the “far past” affects the “recent past” as well as the present, interwoven with the stories of her friends Ben and Sabeen, and especially in her family. The pitch-perfect characterizations of these three kids—their compassion, their vulnerabilities, and the realities of their lives in 2016—ring so true. Jewell’s feel for each one, as unique individuals, is deft. No stereotypes or tropes here.

Perhaps it’s because of this fractious election season or maybe it’s because I’m an ex-New Yorker, but in my opinion, “Towers Falling” should be required reading for ALL Americans, not just middle graders. We need its healing now.

My Book Cover—Unveiled!

So thrilled to share a sneak peak at the beautiful book cover for my forthcoming middle grade debut “Chasing at the Surface” coming in October from Westwinds Press. Could it be more beautiful? A huge thank you to Vicki Knapton at Westwards not just for the gorgeous design but for capturing perfectly the themes of the book.

Chasing at the Surface_fc

 

Writing Real

Illustration by Suzana Apelbaum

Booksellers continue to tell us that girls will read books where the protagonist is a boy but it doesn’t work the other way around. The concept is controversial and debatable whether this is yet another self-inflicted bias perpetuated by how our society divides and compartmentalizes according to race, class, gender and ability. As author Shannon Hale notes, “I’ve heard it a hundred times with Hunger Games: “Boys, even though this is about a girl, you’ll like it!” Even though. I never heard a single time, “Girls, even though Harry Potter is about a boy, you’ll like it!” Read Shannon’s excellent post on her experiences being stamped as a writer of books intended for girls only.

So when I stumbled on Mary Hershey’s novel, The One Where the Kid Nearly Jumps to His Death and Lands in California, (Razorbill) I was pleased on multiple fronts. The book has an unwieldy title, a complicated plot with too many subplots, creepy characters, difficult father-son relationships, rough language…hey, wait a minute…this is starting to sound pretty appealing!

It also had something else to recommend it. The story centers on thirteen-year-old Alastair, who calls himself ‘Stump,’ who is shipped out to spend the summer with his estranged father in California. When Alastair was eight, he lost one of his legs after a too-soon jump from a ski lift. Guess who was supposed to be supervising him at the time? Now Stump is ready to confront his father for ruining his life. Except he didn’t count on a host of new discoveries he makes, not least of which is the unrelenting optimism of Skyla, his father’s new wife who also happens to be a double amputee.

Hershey has woven macabre humor and irreverence into Alastair’s life that I suspect young readers will find satisfying. The jump in the title is both literal and metaphoric, as the best jumps should be. Both Stump and his father are on the brink of looking at each other in new ways. Hershey lets us see their journey with wicked humor and underlying affection.

But the real star of this story is Stump and his voice. Hersey skillfully writes Stump’s disability as just one facet of his personality, not the story’s focus. Stump is the first one out of the gate to crack jokes about his own disability, such as when he takes off his leg at school, puts it in his locker, then ties a rag with fake blood around it. It is worth noting that the author is a former juvenile probation officer who says she has had ‘the great privilege of working with some very funny, smart, and resilient kids.’ In her wonderful depiction of Stump, it shows.

A Perfect Chapter

Perfect chapters don’t just happen…I know that. But I just finished reading one that I like to tell myself did—Chapter 3: “The Possum Wars” in Jacqueline Kelly’s The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate. The writer sat down one morning in her usual writing space, cup of tea or coffee at her side, cat curled sleepily near her feet. She opened her in-progress manuscript to where she’d left off the day before, took a deep breath, and wrote a perfect chapter. 

So, what makes it perfect?

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Patrick Jennings Writes for the Beasts

Guinea Dog by Patrick Jennings

Last night at Secret Garden Bookshop in Seattle, Patrick Jennings one of my favorite kids’ authors gave a reading from his newest book Guinea Dog. Guinea Dog is a middle grade book for 8-12 year olds and it’s my kind of book. It’s the story of a boy who desperately wants a dog. But his dad says oh,no. Dogs bark and whine. They gnaw. They bark. They scratch, beg, and drool. So his mom offers a “think-outside-the-box suggestion” and brings home a guinea pig. But this guinea pig thinks she’s a dog. She barks. She bites. You see where I’m going with this….. Continue reading