Writing Diversity

scbwiHere in the Western Washington, we’re lucky to have a vibrant local chapter of SCBWI (the Society of Children’s Book Writers and illustrators). The topic of last week’s meeting—diversity on children’s books—was right up my alley. The assembled panelists, that included Philip Lee, co-founder of Lee & Lowe Publishing and current publisher of Readers to Eaters; King County Children’s Librarian Ann Crewdson, and authors Liz Wong and Kelly Jones, contributed some great perspectives. Here’s a link to a great recap of the panel.

This topic is of particular interest to me for a couple of reasons. I experienced a teachable moment in the process of including characters and traditions that represented Native peoples of the Pacific Northwest in my debut middle grade novel “Chasing at the Surface” which will be out from WestWinds Press in October of this year (that’s a whole other blog post). But I’ve also been trying to interest agents and editors in another story I’ve written, told from two characters’ perspectives—both 12 year old girls, one black, the other white—whose lives and fates intersect across the span of 35 years.

I’ve lost count of how many times the story has been rejected. No one has ever said to me, “You shouldn’t be writing this,” but its hard to push that away in the space of my own head. Beyond whether or not the plot or the actual writing is appealing, is my race a factor? Am I distracting more than actually doing any good? These are questions that pop up for me with each new rejection.

But the fact is, this story won’t go away. It wants to be told. The theme and message it carries is, I believe, important, and I truly believe there are children out there, beyond the publishing gatekeepers, who need to hear it, read it, and find something to value in it. After much reading, thinking and meditating, and bolstered by last week’s panel discussion, I believe that, yes, I can write this story, carefully and with respect.

At the end of the day, I’m trying to contribute to the conversation by utilizing the tiny platform I may have as a writer, to engage the next generation. It’s uncomfortable, and it comes with a lot of fear of not wanting to mess up, of not wanting to say the wrong thing. But in the end, isn’t that the same that can be said of most things worth doing?
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